How to Monogram a Baseball Cap Using Fast Frames

 



   

A hat is such a fun item to have adorned with a monogram. It’s tomboyish, but something about that monogram makes it such girly fun. I’ll be honest, I am growing my short, angle, bobbed hair out just so I can have a ponytail hanging out the back of my hat.

Hats are also one of the most intimidating items to monogram for a monogrammer. A lot of people think that they need the big scary hat hoop to monogram a hat but that is not true. I used my fast frames. I have the hat fast frame hoop, but in case you don’t that is not a problem.   I share with you the method that worked for me using both the  6” RADIUS HAT HOOP and the 5 X 4 CHRISTMAS STOCKING HOOP.  (I have also use the 7″ X 5″ ATTACHÉ CASE HOOP)

Materials needed:  Fast Frame system with your choice of frame, sticky stabilizer, straight pins, binder clamps, pencil or magic marking fabric marker, hat and thread              
 

Cut your sticky stabilizer accordingly to the fast frame you will be using.  Always allow for extra to wrap it around the front to  maximize stability. 

Once you have your stabilizer secure, it’s time to find the center of the hat. 

 Hats are one of the easiest items to find the center because most hats have a seam down the center. Line the seam up with the center notches in the fast frame. 

 

Here is a tip that may help guide you center notch to center notch. On the BACK of the sticky stabilizer, draw a line down the center so it can be used as a guide. (I show this on the the 5×4 fast frame.)

  

(Note: I used a Sharpie so you could see it well in the photo from the front side, but I recommend using a magic marking fabric marker.)

 

Drawing the line makes it very easy to work the center of the hat along the drawn line. The two photos above and the one below are of the hat being attached to the 5×4 frame. Using this size fast frame, I have the bill facing the front of the fast frame away from the arm attachment. Please make note below that when I use the hat hoop, I have the bill of the hat facing the arm of the arm attachment.

 

As you work the center of the hat down the center of the stabilizer,  be very cautious of the inner flap of the hat. Make sure that you have it pulled down towards the bill of the hat. 



Smooth out all of the wrinkles. Once you have the hat looking like the photo above, pin with straight pins or use binder clamps as I did in the  photo below where I measure for the center of where my monogram will go.





I used a 3″ monogram on this hat with my hat hoop facing the arm attachment.  Keep in mind the actual frame of the fast frame when measuring and find the center accordingly. Allow enough room for your needle to stay clear of the frame.   The width of the hat frame that I have is wider than the actual frame on the 5×4 frame.  The thinner the frame the closer to the bill of the hat you can get the monogram.   There are two hat frames available with the fast frame system.  One has a thinner width frame and the other has a wider width frame. The hat frame I have is the wider one, and although it is a hat frame, it’s actually for embroidering the backs and sides. I have made it work on the front of hats.

 

  If the bill of the hat is facing the back of the attachment arm, remember to rotate the monogram.  I have a friend who told me a story about a lady embroidering a name on a bag upside down because she forgot to rotate it.  It happens!!!!  Unfortunately, it was not the lady’s personal bag so there is a child out there with a very expensive swim bag with their name upside down. 



This is the hat all ready to go on the hat fast frame. Take note that the clamps are actually clamped on the bill as well as the back of the hat.  You want the bill to be as flat as  you can get it.  I babysit the process until I know that all is clear and it will be smooth stitching. 



Thank  you for coming and checking out how to monogram baseball cap using Fast Frames. 



 If you have a hat but do not have access to monogram it, contact me.  I’ll be glad to help you. 

 

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22 thoughts on “How to Monogram a Baseball Cap Using Fast Frames

    • ramiparker says:

      Thank you for that wonderful information, Melissa. If you have any question, just let me know and I’ll try to answer them for you. Good luck with your hat.

  1. Thank you soooooo much! This is a perfect tutorial! Well written and easy to follow and perfect result. First time I had the momogram too high but fixed that on the next one! Kudos to you!

    • ramiparker says:

      Thank you, Marylou! It is one of those embroidery jobs that I still hold my breath to do. I am happy to know the tuturial was helpful. I appreciate that you took a minute to chat with me. Happy stitching!

    • ramiparker says:

      Hi
      Thanks so much for taking a look at my tutorial. I apologize for my delay in my response. It was Mardi Gras in my neck of the woods. Although I didn’t go because it was also freezing in my neck of the woods, I was out of the work room.

      The bill of the cap did not hit the back of the machine. Having it face that way was how I was taught. I know by looking at that frame you’d think it would be the other way, and you probably can make that way work using the same strategy. I’m not sure there would be a right or wrong way. I have found that I like using the 5×4 frame to monogram hats. It has a skinnier frame and I like getting the monogram as close to the bill as I can. There is a hat hoop that has the skinnier frame but I do not own that one. I use straight pins to pin the hat as flat as I can and painters tape or masking tape to hold the bill down as flat as I can get it.

      • ramiparker says:

        Sorry for the delay. I used the same concept putting numbers on the back of the hat. It was actually easier because I did not have the bill of the hat to deal with and with the back opening made the hat easier to maneuver. I have never actually put numbers on the side but mark your center and trial and error to get it. Sorry I wasn’t much help with a more definite method.

  2. Morgan says:

    Thank you for this tutorial! I always wondered what the round fast frame was for! Now I know and will be using it today for monogramming baseball caps for friends!!

    • ramiparker says:

      Yes….that is a hat frame. It may take playing around with the hat to get it flat. Don’t give up!!! If you have the frame that measures somewhere around 4×5 and has skinnier frame, it may allow you to get closer to the bill of the hat with your monogram. I have been using the the same method on my skinny edge frame…. unless you have the rounded frame with the skinnier frame. There is a skinny frame hat frame. I don’t have it. Good luck and thanks for reading.

    • ramiparker says:

      Any type of baseball hat should work fine. I have used plain and the ones with the netting on the back/sides like the trucker type.

    • ramiparker says:

      If I remember correctly that one was unstructured. I have done several that were lightly structured if that makes sense. They were too terribly stiff.

    • ramiparker says:

      Good morning
      I do monogram hats for local folks that bring me their own hat or if you’re not local, you can send me a hat. I do not stock any hats for resale. I found that heads were different and not all hats were made for the different heads. People liked it best to bring me the hat that they found fit them.

    • ramiparker says:

      Good morning Joyce,

      You can do the sides and backs of hats using the fast frame by the same method; however, the fast frames do not work on the PE 770. There is go news though…..http://www.theluckyrabbit.com/?p=268
      Click the link for a tutorial on how to make a hat frame for your hoop using a clipboard.

      Good luck and thanks for reading!!

    • ramiparker says:

      I am not sure what you’re calling a fitted hat??…..possibly with out the snaps or Velcro adjust loop thing?? It took me forever to figure out what a SnapBack hat was….I felt so silly. I would imagine that you could use sticky spray, lots of pins and patience to get the back flat enough to do it. You might be able to figure out how to put the back on one of those smaller/skinnier fast frames like for a sleeve. I find a lot of times you just need to play around with frames and items.

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